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Perplexity + Rabbit

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00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:02,621Speaker 0
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This space was downloaded via spacesdown.com.

00:00:02,842 --> 00:00:04,529Speaker 0
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Visit to download your spaces today.

00:05:21,886 --> 00:06:57,052Speaker 0
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you Hey, guys, you guys hear me all right?

00:07:00,754 --> 00:07:01,094Speaker 1
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Yep.

00:07:01,995 --> 00:07:03,195Speaker 1
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Can you hear me?

00:07:03,235 --> 00:07:03,536Speaker 1
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Yes.

00:07:05,337 --> 00:07:06,077Speaker 0
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Awesome.

00:07:06,117 --> 00:07:07,278Speaker 0
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Yeah, I think we can start.

00:07:08,719 --> 00:07:09,099Speaker 0
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I'm ready.

00:07:09,439 --> 00:07:10,019Speaker 1
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OK, awesome.

00:07:11,700 --> 00:07:11,961Speaker 1
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All right.

00:07:12,461 --> 00:07:15,142Speaker 1
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Are we good to announce?

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Yeah, why not?

00:07:16,183 --> 00:07:19,425Speaker 0
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Let's do it.

00:07:20,005 --> 00:07:21,546Speaker 1
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OK, cool.

00:07:22,727 --> 00:07:24,188Speaker 1
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Let's tweet it first before.

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making the announcement here.

00:07:29,071 --> 00:07:32,572Speaker 0
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I think they're not expecting the way we're going to announce this.

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Insanely, insanely great value for both Perpexi users and Revit R1 holders.

00:07:39,993 --> 00:07:42,114Speaker 0
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So yeah.

00:07:42,454 --> 00:07:43,114Speaker 1
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Yep, yep.

00:07:46,814 --> 00:07:49,175Speaker 1
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All right, let me just go ahead and read it.

00:08:19,813 --> 00:08:21,575Speaker 0
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All right, so we're going to start a conversation in a bit.

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But first of all, both PerpXity and Revit official account will tweet about the announcement for the details.

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So we're ready when you are.

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Let's just wait for a tweet, and then we can start a conversation.

00:08:49,565 --> 00:08:50,486Speaker 1
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OK, I think it's done.

00:08:51,747 --> 00:08:56,970Speaker 1
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So I'm pretty excited to share that Perplexity and Rabbit are partnering together.

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So we are excited to power real-time precise answers for Rabbit R1 using our Perplexity online LLM APIs that have no knowledge cut off, just always plugged into a search index.

00:09:12,000 --> 00:09:22,856Speaker 1
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And the first 100,000 Rabbit R1 purchases will also get one year free of perplexity pro where that came from.

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i didn't know that spaces have that feature.

00:09:25,538 --> 00:09:26,519Speaker 0
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but yeah continue everyone.

00:09:28,180 --> 00:09:34,205Speaker 1
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okay yeah the first hundred thousand rabbit r1 purchases are going to get one year free of perplexity pro.

00:09:35,606 --> 00:09:38,408Speaker 1
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so it's basically like perplexity pro one year free is 200 bucks.

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so if you pay 200 bucks to purchase a rabbit r1 you're getting twice the value.

00:09:45,302 --> 00:09:57,639Speaker 0
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Yeah, so we had an interaction on X. couple of days ago and then what's going on?

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the next is the following couple of days.

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teams been working really hard together to make this happen and I think you know to me it's a no-brainer if you think about you know RabbitR1 with price of $199, no actually not $200 but $199, no subscription, and the Perpexity errand is generous enough to offer a practicing pro for a whole year, that was actually $200, so that's one extra buck on top of it.

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But I want to share a little bit of background on what's going on because To us, we've been huge fans of Perplexity from day one since the launch, even though I haven't got a chance to talk to everyone personally, but we are a pretty early startup that we started trying to test their.

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So we are their customers too, anyway.

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So I think what's most impressed me about, and quite ironically, it's the same reason that why we are so disappointed with other LLMs out there, for instance, GPTs and Entropic, is that they did very, very poorly on what they call web browsing or up-to-date search.

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And that's when we realized and we found Perplexity and we immediately did a test run.

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That was many, many months ago and the results were insanely good.

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It beat all the other guys out of the water.

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Even though the way that we connected and we established this partnership is totally new, but I think it's determined to happen, at least from my perspective, because our end goal is to bring the best experiences to this little piece of device, and we choose whoever is the best in the industry, and I think right now, up to date information, search and general knowledge, you know, I think Proxity is definitely the go-to choice.

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And I noticed on the Twitter thread as well, you know, a lot of people are replacing this, replacing the Google search with Proxity, and that's certainly also my case.

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So I just want to talk from, you know, being a customer myself, being a user myself, that's my angle, why this deal makes perfect sense.

00:12:28,322 --> 00:12:29,322Speaker 1
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Yeah, thanks a lot, Jesse.

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So actually, for a lot of people might not know here, the way the whole thing came together was, I think I posted something that's so fun with the rabbit.

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I think everyone on Twitter was just taking your rabbit device and like posting their product on it on the screen.

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And then you looked at it and you were like, let's work together, co-tweeted me.

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Then I co-tweeted you and then you just made it official on Twitter.

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So we never even actually exchanged emails or anything of that nature or got intros in the traditional way.

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The whole thing came together just by people being excited for us to work together.

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So what do you have to say about that?

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And I guess you're also like, you know, going viral on Twitter, or rather you should call it X here.

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And how, you know, you've grown so, so fast, like so quickly.

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So how are you thinking about all this?

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Yeah, so we're in fact a little bit over swung in the past couple of days.

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We saw basically RapidR1.

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every day was another 10,000.

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So right now as we're speaking, That means that we're 50% already at the top 100K.

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But I also want to share a little bit.

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So that's like $10 million in sales.

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Yeah, $10 million in five days.

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It's okay, I guess.

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But I think what we are currently doing is that now we have a pretty good understanding of the demand.

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We already pre-communicated with our logistics regarding to the ODM and OEM and want to make sure they catch up with the speed.

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So I think after this 50,000 units, the future will longer distinguish in batches.

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What we're going to do is that we're going to basically work with ODM, OEM, and our own internal hardware team to catch up with the speed so that we are no longer facing this one month, one month stripping.

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So the goal here is that hard date, March 31st, which is Easter, we're going to start ship in the first batch.

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And we're going to do our best to ship all the future batches as early as we can.

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And that's the best we can do at the moment.

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But I think, you know, hopefully, you know, our partnership will further incentive that.

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Because really, if you just do simple math, you know, $100, $199 and $200 back, that's not too hard to understand.

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But, you know, more importantly, it's not about the money, it's about you're getting the best experiences in a very, very well-designed and intuitive device with not only what GPTs can offer, what the other devices can offer, but with large action models running behind.

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So I think it's quite promising.

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And speaking of the deal, I'm not sure if you agree with me, but it seems like we accidentally invented a new type of deal-making that happens on Twitter with quote, retweet.

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I don't think any, you know, major players have ever done that so fast and have ever done that in such manner.

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So I want to hear what your thoughts on that.

00:15:48,669 --> 00:15:55,051Speaker 0
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It almost starts with a meme and then we quickly make it official and we quickly make it work on our devices.

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And then here we have the partnership announcement within a week.

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So what's your thought on that?

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I mean, we love working with you because you move incredibly fast.

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Like the moment you told you want to work together, immediately we started a Slack channel and then your team started hacking on this and you sent me a demo.

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Like, and then, you know, we got energized looking at the demo.

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We were like, Hey, like these guys work fast, like as fast or even faster than us.

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And we used to think we work fast, but obviously after seeing you, we think we can do even better.

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And then we want to make our APIs even faster.

00:16:30,179 --> 00:16:33,566Speaker 1
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So maybe I want to lead from there to like, you know, your thoughts on the whole.

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voice-to-voice form factor, right?

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Because the Rabbit device is definitely taking us beyond just consuming screens and text in the form of pixels to just interacting more naturally.

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So what are your thoughts on the next stage of how people consume and interact with all these AI chatbots and assistants?

00:16:56,617 --> 00:17:23,050Speaker 0
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Yeah, so I think being our age, we grow up, unfortunately, where the dictation engine was never invented, and then it was invented, and it was put in use in a horrible way, that I think our current generation are victims of the early days of the dictation engine, early days of the natural language processing before the natural language model.

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of course, and transformal and all that.

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So I think, you know, me personally, I identify myself as probably along with everyone here is a PTSD with the early version of dictation engine.

00:17:38,962 --> 00:17:46,008Speaker 0
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That's why I guess, you know, it creates such a strong impact on our mind that, okay, maybe voice is not the right way to go.

00:17:46,068 --> 00:17:47,229Speaker 0
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I'd rather prefer type.

00:17:48,430 --> 00:17:52,973Speaker 0
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But I think, you know, Our principle is very simple.

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It's that what's the most intuitive way for communication, right?

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Think about everyone.

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If we convert this Twitter spaces into a type Twitter spaces or into even worse, like a fax Twitter spaces, non-instant message Twitter spaces.

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I don't think that we can deliver all this information in relatively short period of time.

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how a human communicates with a human, and I guess before the neural stuff becomes put in use, and natural language, especially conversation in voice, is still to be the most efficient way.

00:18:37,019 --> 00:19:23,606Speaker 0
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Now the problem becomes easy because we just need to fix PTSD, but I think if you look at the past three or four years, probably especially the past three years, a lot of the fundamental infrastructure around that has been significantly improved to where, you know, the younger generation especially, I'm not sure if I'm not sure how many of the listeners here got a 5-year-old, 6-year-old, 7-year-old kid, but the younger generation that were born after 2010, I see among all the kids that they actually prefer the dictation icon on the keyboard rather than start typing.

00:19:23,746 --> 00:19:29,610Speaker 0
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So I think that the use behavior in a different generation is already starting to shift.

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And of course, the fundamental reason is because a lot of these infrastructures are good enough, are redundant enough.

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So for us, we are not saying that, yo, you can only talk to R1.

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If you shake the R1, the keyboard will pop up.

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But if you think about the most intuitive way, and if you're in a rush, there's nothing better than just find that analog button, press and hold and start talking.

00:19:55,749 --> 00:19:58,131Speaker 0
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So I guess that's our design principle.

00:19:58,231 --> 00:20:05,977Speaker 0
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We understand the current challenges of difficulties, but we want to push this a little bit further because the method is not wrong, right?

00:20:06,017 --> 00:20:07,198Speaker 0
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The approach is not wrong.

00:20:07,278 --> 00:20:10,420Speaker 0
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It feels wrong because the technology won't ready.

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But I think, like I said, in the past three, four years, a lot of infrastructure has been significantly achieved to where we're confident now enough to build a device like R1 in its full factor.

00:20:23,922 --> 00:20:25,383Speaker 1
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Yeah, that's that's cool.

00:20:25,463 --> 00:20:32,485Speaker 1
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And like, I also want to like, you know, lead you to the follow up question there, which is, what do you what do you think about today's latency?

00:20:32,985 --> 00:20:36,646Speaker 1
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And what do you think the latency for voice to voice is going to look like?

00:20:38,067 --> 00:20:40,908Speaker 1
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Maybe, you know, like, six months from now or a year from now?

00:20:41,108 --> 00:20:46,450Speaker 0
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Yeah, I think that's a major, like major, major task here.

00:20:47,582 --> 00:20:50,223Speaker 0
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I was actually talking to our engineer team.

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I think we should have a special force team just to focus on the latency on all the features, not only on search features, but on all the features.

00:20:59,867 --> 00:21:01,967Speaker 0
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I'll share a story.

00:21:02,047 --> 00:21:07,429Speaker 0
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So I built an app like many, many years ago called Music Flow.

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It was primarily launched in Asia because we have partnerships with the music labels back in Asia.

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and it was not launched here.

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And the app is extremely, extremely simple.

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It's just the entire screen is a button.

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you press and hold and you talk and the music starts playing.

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And we did a lot of work in the back end to make sure that the first piece starts playing within a second, 800 milliseconds to be exact.

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And that app just accidentally went viral because of the speed.

00:21:35,822 --> 00:21:41,206Speaker 0
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We didn't create any additional features compared to a traditional Spotify or traditional Apple Music, Google Music.

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We just did that voice plus sub-second response time.

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And another thing we did is that we We basically used natural language processing to parse every part of the lyrics, so that you can literally just, you know, rumble a part of the lyrics and it still matches the song.

00:21:59,976 --> 00:22:14,364Speaker 0
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So that's basically all the things we did, but I think, you know, the huge benefits from the sub-second response, and that lesson, you know, keeps in my heart so hard, and then we kind of like, when we design a Revit OS, is always our goal.

00:22:15,065 --> 00:22:24,956Speaker 0
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But if you look at the reality right now, I'm sure a lot of people have seen the demos I posted on Twitter and on Discord.

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I demonstrated to play a song that's on par with sub-second latency.

00:22:29,960 --> 00:22:52,611Speaker 0
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I think in reality, you know, search web browsing, search up-to-date information, and also some of the vision features like the GPT-4 vision provides and our own vision features provide, you know, sometimes it takes two seconds, sometimes it takes more than that, and vision probably, you know, the first time I showed probably take like 15 seconds, and we have another version that now currently takes about 7 seconds.

00:22:52,931 --> 00:22:54,473Speaker 0
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So those are things I'm not happy with.

00:22:54,533 --> 00:22:57,456Speaker 0
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But I think latency shouldn't be feature by feature.

00:22:57,556 --> 00:23:03,943Speaker 0
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Latency should be a universal bar for natural language interaction with any devices.

00:23:05,083 --> 00:23:12,185Speaker 0
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and I remember I read a paper, I probably can find that paper later on and post it on my Twitter, but there's a research on human brain.

00:23:12,245 --> 00:23:15,546Speaker 0
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understand and handle natural language in speed wise.

00:23:15,806 --> 00:23:21,308Speaker 0
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I think, you know, there's a couple of the different languages and they can differ very, very differently.

00:23:21,348 --> 00:23:29,853Speaker 0
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Like, I think Japanese as well as a couple of other languages, you actually process that information faster because of how the language is structured.

00:23:29,913 --> 00:23:33,837Speaker 0
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But I think 500 milliseconds should be like the golden bar.

00:23:34,377 --> 00:23:36,879Speaker 0
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I did a couple of tests internally.

00:23:36,899 --> 00:23:42,123Speaker 0
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I think 500 milliseconds natural language voice response is the golden bar.

00:23:42,344 --> 00:23:46,367Speaker 0
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You don't want to be slower than that, but you also want to be faster than that.

00:23:46,427 --> 00:24:09,282Speaker 0
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Being faster than that, people are scared off because they think that, oh, you pre-listen and you if it's slower than maybe 800 milliseconds, and people will confuse and try to ask the same question again, knowing that maybe it's a network issue or maybe you didn't quite get the voice right.

00:24:09,622 --> 00:24:15,724Speaker 0
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So I think 500 milliseconds is kind of like a universal benchmark that we're trying to hit on among all the features.

00:24:16,905 --> 00:24:18,445Speaker 0
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That's kind of like my answer.

00:24:20,206 --> 00:24:31,157Speaker 1
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And Bear, would you consider your, whatever latency you have today, How do you compare that with other similar apps like chat, GPT, voice-to-voice?

00:24:31,197 --> 00:24:33,059Speaker 1
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Have you tried comparing the two?

00:24:33,099 --> 00:24:42,708Speaker 0
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Yeah, so we did have a technology we call Kernel that we started working on this pretty early, more than two years, that would basically establish a streaming model.

00:24:43,209 --> 00:24:48,814Speaker 0
24:43 - 24:48

Because if you think about why there's a latency, so if you press this button, the microphone starts recording.

00:24:50,905 --> 00:25:19,592Speaker 0
24:50 - 25:19

in an audio file and that audio file needs to be converted into strings and that strings send it to the dictation engine or TTS text-to-speech, sorry, and convert to text, and that text then into OpenAI, a tragedy API, or perplexity API, or whatever large-length model for intentional understanding, and then start generating based on their speed, and then it's a round trip, right?

00:25:19,632 --> 00:25:22,114Speaker 0
25:19 - 25:22

This is a single trip, and everything reverts again.

00:25:22,514 --> 00:25:34,102Speaker 0
25:22 - 25:34

So if you add all this together, if you just go there and build a voice AI with no optimization based off GPT-4, we know for a fact that single dialogue you're looking at probably five to six seconds.

00:25:35,064 --> 00:25:38,616Speaker 0
25:35 - 25:38

But we made a streaming model to where we basically cut off the chunks.

00:25:44,070 --> 00:25:45,251Speaker 0
25:44 - 25:45

entire model of streaming.

00:25:45,792 --> 00:25:47,434Speaker 0
25:45 - 25:47

I think I'm not the best guy to talk about this.

00:25:47,554 --> 00:25:54,341Speaker 0
25:47 - 25:54

Maybe our CTO later on can write something about this, but we do have technology to make the sequence into a streaming.

00:25:54,722 --> 00:26:11,335Speaker 0
25:54 - 26:11

We're not necessarily accelerating GPT or perplexity speed at the moment, but with this streaming mechanism that if you ask non-search up-to-date information where millisecond per response.

00:26:11,975 --> 00:26:24,582Speaker 0
26:11 - 26:24

But I wish our team, you and me, can do something just on up-to-date information search.

00:26:24,762 --> 00:26:26,723Speaker 0
26:24 - 26:26

Maybe we can push this far a little bit.

00:26:26,783 --> 00:26:30,805Speaker 0
26:26 - 26:30

Because again, whatever we're going to push, this is going to be industrial standard.

00:26:31,846 --> 00:26:34,227Speaker 0
26:31 - 26:34

Because right now, it is what it is.

00:26:34,528 --> 00:26:35,908Speaker 0
26:34 - 26:35

Yeah.

00:26:36,088 --> 00:26:36,509Speaker 1
26:36 - 26:36

Absolutely.

00:26:36,529 --> 00:26:38,350Speaker 1
26:36 - 26:38

Yeah, we are certainly at the cutting edge here.

00:26:39,905 --> 00:26:49,533Speaker 1
26:39 - 26:49

In fact, like the fact that you wanted to do it through streaming that already makes it much, like the perceived latency is already a lot better than waiting for the full response.

00:26:50,194 --> 00:26:53,376Speaker 1
26:50 - 26:53

And, you know, I think there are so many more things we can do to speed it up.

00:26:53,897 --> 00:26:58,981Speaker 1
26:53 - 26:58

So I also want to talk to you about, you know, you selling 50,000 units in five days.

00:27:00,482 --> 00:27:07,087Speaker 1
27:00 - 27:07

There was a tweet from Daniel Groves where he said, for context, the iPod sold 125,000 in the first quarter.

00:27:09,921 --> 00:27:12,504Speaker 1
27:09 - 27:12

And iPod is considered a historically successful product.

00:27:13,404 --> 00:27:18,029Speaker 1
27:13 - 27:18

And the iPhone sold like 270,000 in the first 48 hours.

00:27:18,089 --> 00:27:27,558Speaker 1
27:18 - 27:27

So it's obviously like, you know, R1 is way more, looking at the pace, the trajectory, it's likely going to beat the iPod for the whole quarter.

00:27:30,406 --> 00:27:40,212Speaker 1
27:30 - 27:40

So obviously, there's going to be high expectations for the next device you're going to make, so what are your plans for R2 or further devices in the future?

00:27:40,232 --> 00:27:48,977Speaker 0
27:40 - 27:48

Yeah, so first of all, I didn't quite know that number until I saw the tweet, and that makes my head spin for a sec.

00:27:50,018 --> 00:27:54,782Speaker 0
27:50 - 27:54

But I also realized that, you know, we're talking about no internet, no Twitter versus internet Twitter.

00:27:54,982 --> 00:27:58,044Speaker 0
27:54 - 27:58

I mean, we're spread at a different pace of speed, right?

00:27:58,064 --> 00:28:02,288Speaker 0
27:58 - 28:02

So I don't think we're outperforming iPod at the moment.

00:28:02,388 --> 00:28:04,609Speaker 0
28:02 - 28:04

We're a very, very young startup.

00:28:05,430 --> 00:28:06,850Speaker 0
28:05 - 28:06

This is our first generation device.

00:28:06,930 --> 00:28:13,012Speaker 0
28:06 - 28:13

When Apple launched Apple, they have a tremendous history of setting up the bar and make everything iconic.

00:28:13,732 --> 00:28:16,893Speaker 0
28:13 - 28:16

Pretty much everything they did sets a bar.

00:28:17,373 --> 00:28:23,035Speaker 0
28:17 - 28:23

So first of all, I'm not delusional just by the numbers that we're getting for the first couple of days.

00:28:23,355 --> 00:28:35,398Speaker 0
28:23 - 28:35

We're not delusional that we're arrogant enough thinking that, OK, this is better is changing and they don't have social media whatsoever.

00:28:35,498 --> 00:28:42,382Speaker 0
28:35 - 28:42

So I would assume if Apple has social media back then, it's probably going to be way more than that.

00:28:45,083 --> 00:28:56,254Speaker 0
28:45 - 28:56

From that angle, to your question, to your point, I don't think anyone is certain of which form factor will be the best.

00:28:57,216 --> 00:29:04,485Speaker 0
28:57 - 29:04

I just saw Mark Zuckerberg had a Twitter today about.

00:29:04,505 --> 00:29:09,219Speaker 0
29:04 - 29:09

he talked about source of Lama 3 that they were developing.

00:29:09,639 --> 00:29:18,501Speaker 0
29:09 - 29:18

And on the end of the mini clip, he said he believes that glasses are the best form factor because he sees what you see and listen to.

00:29:18,721 --> 00:29:19,921Speaker 0
29:18 - 29:19

I don't quite agree with that.

00:29:20,261 --> 00:29:31,923Speaker 0
29:20 - 29:31

I think, you know, no one has figured out or no one should have the confidence before they even test it on the user's hand and say, OK, this is the best form factor.

00:29:31,944 --> 00:29:47,190Speaker 0
29:31 - 29:47

So R1 is not pushing the edges on all the components, but the other way around, quite contrary, it's a result of de-risk.

00:29:47,250 --> 00:29:52,655Speaker 0
29:47 - 29:52

Because we are new, and the operating system is new, the entire AI stuff is new.

00:29:53,420 --> 00:29:58,062Speaker 0
29:53 - 29:58

and we don't know what's the best form factor either.

00:29:58,082 --> 00:30:01,763Speaker 0
29:58 - 30:01

and plus there's a lot of latency issues of course.

00:30:02,524 --> 00:30:16,529Speaker 0
30:02 - 30:16

So we don't want to risk presenting a completely new way of interacting with devices plus give you another kind of like insecurity of oh this is a completely new form factor and you have to learn from the start how to use it.

00:30:17,369 --> 00:30:24,495Speaker 0
30:17 - 30:24

And that's why when we design R1, we think about, okay, we need to present something that you're already familiar with, but in a new way.

00:30:25,236 --> 00:30:31,642Speaker 0
30:25 - 30:31

And that's where I'm so happy that communities are getting it.

00:30:31,902 --> 00:30:35,465Speaker 0
30:31 - 30:35

Because the first thing I did is I bought nine Tomokochi.

00:30:35,885 --> 00:30:39,087Speaker 0
30:35 - 30:39

for my entire design team and engineering team back then.

00:30:39,247 --> 00:30:40,828Speaker 0
30:39 - 30:40

We're even smaller than today.

00:30:41,328 --> 00:30:48,772Speaker 0
30:41 - 30:48

But it was about a year, year and a half ago, I bought nine Tomokochi from Amazon and I sent them as a gift.

00:30:48,852 --> 00:30:50,353Speaker 0
30:48 - 30:50

I'm like, hey, this is what we're making.

00:30:51,173 --> 00:30:57,196Speaker 0
30:51 - 30:57

And then obviously, you know, we all love the Pokédex and no one has made a Pokédex yet.

00:30:57,716 --> 00:31:02,499Speaker 0
30:57 - 31:02

So I think, you know, we want to bring that culture, you know, relevance to you.

00:31:03,850 --> 00:31:16,177Speaker 0
31:03 - 31:16

Plus, we know that the most efficient and highly redundant form factor of voice dictation and voice commands and voice interaction is not a weak word.

00:31:17,017 --> 00:31:40,921Speaker 0
31:17 - 31:40

I don't like weak word because I was at one time in a meeting with a couple of Amazon folks and obviously we're talking about Alix, and obviously they keep saying Alix, and the entire meeting becomes a mayhem because they all have an Alix speaker around, and then a whole bunch of Alix start talking to each other, and that's very, very dumb.

00:31:41,921 --> 00:31:48,946Speaker 0
31:41 - 31:48

So I don't want a wake word, and then what if you don't have a wake word, and you think about what's being already in use, right?

00:31:49,546 --> 00:31:57,676Speaker 0
31:49 - 31:57

And then I think I have another example, I'm like, okay, think about what's the most crucial scenario that you need to use voice and voice only.

00:31:58,397 --> 00:32:04,004Speaker 0
31:58 - 32:04

Then we think about the modern warfare, right?

00:32:04,044 --> 00:32:06,287Speaker 0
32:04 - 32:06

The soldiers and the military force.

00:32:07,328 --> 00:32:12,892Speaker 0
32:07 - 32:12

They're either fighting or dying, but they all have this very redundant design.

00:32:13,532 --> 00:32:19,496Speaker 0
32:13 - 32:19

One button, no nothing, just one big button right next to their chest or right on their headset.

00:32:20,477 --> 00:32:29,764Speaker 0
32:20 - 32:29

You just push and talk and you're not pushing and waiting for activation sound and you start talking and then automatically detects when you're off.

00:32:30,344 --> 00:32:31,565Speaker 0
32:30 - 32:31

You have to push and hold it.

00:32:32,126 --> 00:32:34,888Speaker 0
32:32 - 32:34

And then on civilian market, yeah, it's even more.

00:32:35,906 --> 00:32:37,047Speaker 0
32:35 - 32:37

It's called walkie-talkie.

00:32:37,827 --> 00:32:39,588Speaker 0
32:37 - 32:39

We all know that and we all have that.

00:32:40,108 --> 00:32:50,692Speaker 0
32:40 - 32:50

So I guess that's why we combine all these elements together to put in those thoughts and that eventually set the form factor of R1.

00:32:50,712 --> 00:32:59,075Speaker 0
32:50 - 32:59

We want to offer you a modern version of Tomokochi and Pokedex powered by AI, but with a very redundant push-talk button that you probably already know how to use.

00:33:01,182 --> 00:33:02,103Speaker 1
33:01 - 33:02

That's very insightful.

00:33:02,283 --> 00:33:16,697Speaker 1
33:02 - 33:16

I didn't realize that your rationale for having the button was to not get into this problem where there's a whole room of people using a bunch of devices and all of them are calling them out by their name.

00:33:17,518 --> 00:33:19,859Speaker 1
33:17 - 33:19

So that, yeah, that makes a lot of sense.

00:33:20,640 --> 00:33:26,763Speaker 1
33:20 - 33:26

And so, look, I mean, the other thing, you know, is obviously, you know, we've been sort of building this in public.

00:33:27,403 --> 00:33:33,247Speaker 1
33:27 - 33:33

I mean, first of all, you've been doing it way more actively than pretty much anyone I've seen so far.

00:33:34,167 --> 00:33:38,249Speaker 1
33:34 - 33:38

to the extent that everyone on X is like a supporter of your company.

00:33:38,750 --> 00:33:40,851Speaker 1
33:38 - 33:40

So what did you learn the most?

00:33:41,231 --> 00:33:48,135Speaker 1
33:41 - 33:48

What surprised you the most about all this attention you've got and all this customer demand that you've got and user love that you've got so far?

00:33:48,455 --> 00:33:51,036Speaker 0
33:48 - 33:51

Yeah, that's a great question, actually.

00:33:51,056 --> 00:33:52,217Speaker 0
33:51 - 33:52

A couple of things.

00:33:52,537 --> 00:33:54,138Speaker 0
33:52 - 33:54

First of all, this is not my first startup.

00:33:55,418 --> 00:34:00,681Speaker 0
33:55 - 34:00

I've dedicated my entire career building ideas on my own.

00:34:02,748 --> 00:34:26,995Speaker 0
34:02 - 34:26

This one in particular, with the journey of Rabbit, which we just started, is that what I learned, probably this is something that I learned in the past weeks, to be honest, is that I didn't expect how tired of people towards their existing apps and existing phones.

00:34:27,215 --> 00:34:42,033Speaker 0
34:27 - 34:42

I know I want to get rid of the apps, And I know iPhones are boring, but I don't expect to start such great waves of resonance that people are accidentally designing new phone factors for us.

00:34:42,893 --> 00:34:45,594Speaker 0
34:42 - 34:45

That's what you see me post on Twitter with supports.

00:34:46,254 --> 00:34:47,275Speaker 0
34:46 - 34:47

People are designing watches.

00:34:47,935 --> 00:34:51,016Speaker 0
34:47 - 34:51

doing all kinds of different things and different colors.

00:34:51,376 --> 00:35:02,719Speaker 0
34:51 - 35:02

So I think that quite surprised me, because I think maybe it's going to be very hard to convince people that this is new and we need to figure out a magic for people to love it.

00:35:04,279 --> 00:35:06,620Speaker 0
35:04 - 35:06

I think that's quite a surprise.

00:35:07,280 --> 00:35:14,899Speaker 0
35:07 - 35:14

And another thing is that, I think color played a lot of roles here.

00:35:15,580 --> 00:35:38,215Speaker 0
35:15 - 35:38

I would say that if we design this to an apple color scheme or you know, mainstream color scheme, say if we use just matte black or silver, I wouldn't expect the R1 can be as iconic in design industry as so quickly as what we are experiencing now.

00:35:38,915 --> 00:35:47,261Speaker 0
35:38 - 35:47

So I think color plays a lot of factors on helping us to get our, you know, images and form factors out there.

00:35:48,361 --> 00:36:03,187Speaker 0
35:48 - 36:03

But to myself, I also learned quite important lesson is that No matter how successful you are and how well-educated and experienced you are, being a startup is a reset.

00:36:03,547 --> 00:36:11,669Speaker 0
36:03 - 36:11

If you want to do a startup, it has nothing to do with whatever you did before and it has nothing to do with your past titles or whatever that is.

00:36:12,309 --> 00:36:13,949Speaker 0
36:12 - 36:13

It's always a hard bootstrap.

00:36:14,149 --> 00:36:16,010Speaker 0
36:14 - 36:16

It always starts from the beginning.

00:36:18,111 --> 00:36:26,457Speaker 0
36:18 - 36:26

That's why I try to put myself as transparent, as active as possible, even though sometimes it's quite exhausting.

00:36:26,517 --> 00:36:33,022Speaker 0
36:26 - 36:33

But I think we position ourselves, if you look at our teams, amazing teams, they've achieved a lot of things.

00:36:33,782 --> 00:36:36,785Speaker 0
36:33 - 36:36

But we, deep in our heart, we understand we're a new startup.

00:36:37,688 --> 00:36:44,436Speaker 0
36:37 - 36:44

We're a new startup and this is our very first product and nothing needs to be prejudged.

00:36:44,637 --> 00:36:56,311Speaker 0
36:44 - 36:56

We have to act like a startup and catch up with the startup speed and be the fastest guy out there and at the same time be as transparent as we can.

00:36:58,979 --> 00:37:07,470Speaker 1
36:58 - 37:07

Speaking of that, what are some other AI products out there that are interesting you and exciting you today?

00:37:09,520 --> 00:37:13,222Speaker 0
37:09 - 37:13

Well, I like just to test new things.

00:37:13,262 --> 00:37:15,904Speaker 0
37:13 - 37:15

I guess you can categorize myself as like a super read adapter.

00:37:17,544 --> 00:37:20,766Speaker 0
37:17 - 37:20

So I was actually in the RFI test group.

00:37:21,527 --> 00:37:30,412Speaker 0
37:21 - 37:30

Back then, I was actually one of the first, I think I'm probably the first 200 guys to ever get hold of Google Glass back then.

00:37:31,052 --> 00:37:34,954Speaker 0
37:31 - 37:34

And obviously, I'm one of the early Oculus DK1 purchasers.

00:37:35,875 --> 00:37:38,416Speaker 0
37:35 - 37:38

And obviously, I support ARRI.

00:37:40,092 --> 00:37:43,576Speaker 0
37:40 - 37:43

if you guys still remember the first smartwatch.

00:37:44,737 --> 00:37:45,918Speaker 0
37:44 - 37:45

So I tried a lot of new things.

00:37:45,998 --> 00:37:46,859Speaker 0
37:45 - 37:46

I could try new things.

00:37:46,919 --> 00:37:51,244Speaker 0
37:46 - 37:51

I probably set up an alarm on Friday to order the Vision Pro as well.

00:37:52,745 --> 00:38:08,723Speaker 0
37:52 - 38:08

But I think when we started Rabbit, there's AVI, Tab, there's MetaGlasses, there's a new generation of Google AI or whatever that is.

00:38:09,823 --> 00:38:16,344Speaker 0
38:09 - 38:16

But the way we position ourselves is we first position ourselves as users, right?

00:38:16,844 --> 00:38:19,165Speaker 0
38:16 - 38:19

I first ordered a human AI pin on day one.

00:38:19,845 --> 00:38:20,445Speaker 0
38:19 - 38:20

I'm still waiting.

00:38:21,185 --> 00:38:26,486Speaker 0
38:21 - 38:26

And I watched the entire talk from AVI, from Tab.

00:38:27,386 --> 00:38:36,775Speaker 0
38:27 - 38:36

I learned a lot, you know, like it's quite a different perspective that everyone is working towards the same goal, which is, you know, that's the thing I think we're all getting excited.

00:38:38,016 --> 00:39:00,262Speaker 0
38:38 - 39:00

So the thing is I put myself into the user perspective, and if you put yourself in the user's perspective, you kind of like you know, because you are also doing the same thing, you are making a new device with AI, that eliminates a lot of your personal evils and that eliminates a lot of your, you know, prejudgment or misunderstanding.

00:39:01,443 --> 00:39:19,177Speaker 0
39:01 - 39:19

But really just to put myself in the user's perspective and make relevant decisions, because if I put myself in a user's perspective, And knowing that the current level of AI, I'm not sure if I'm going to pay $800 plus monthly subscription, right?

00:39:19,617 --> 00:39:27,102Speaker 0
39:19 - 39:27

I'm not sure if I'm going to just get rid of the screen completely, and I'm not sure if I'm going to wear a glass.

00:39:27,502 --> 00:39:32,045Speaker 0
39:27 - 39:32

I mean, I paid $6,000 to get a LASIK to get rid of my glass.

00:39:32,125 --> 00:39:36,407Speaker 0
39:32 - 39:36

I'm not sure why I'm going to put a glass every day to work.

00:39:38,668 --> 00:39:45,590Speaker 0
39:38 - 39:45

You know, we put ourselves in user's perspective and I interviewed with each of our team members, like what do you think about this if you're a user?

00:39:46,330 --> 00:39:47,551Speaker 0
39:46 - 39:47

We got a lot of insights.

00:39:47,771 --> 00:39:49,151Speaker 0
39:47 - 39:49

I think that's the best practice.

00:39:49,551 --> 00:39:53,052Speaker 0
39:49 - 39:53

Anyway, but again, for the record, I like competition.

00:39:53,492 --> 00:39:56,113Speaker 0
39:53 - 39:56

I think competition is great.

00:39:56,633 --> 00:40:02,495Speaker 0
39:56 - 40:02

If you have competition, that leads to innovation, that leads to honesty.

00:40:02,815 --> 00:40:11,252Speaker 0
40:02 - 40:11

And ultimately, with competition, everyone is going to make their product better and much more affordable and accessible.

00:40:12,213 --> 00:40:17,036Speaker 0
40:12 - 40:17

So all in all, competition benefits customers and audiences, right?

00:40:17,116 --> 00:40:22,179Speaker 0
40:17 - 40:22

So we love competition, you know, that pushes us move fast.

00:40:23,880 --> 00:40:30,604Speaker 0
40:23 - 40:30

Yeah, I think, you know, put yourself in the user's perspective, that's most important.

00:40:30,824 --> 00:40:42,378Speaker 1
40:30 - 40:42

And do you have any thoughts on, you know, imaginary future where Siri is able to do a lot of things voice to voice with generative AI more natively.

00:40:43,319 --> 00:40:46,601Speaker 1
40:43 - 40:46

Do you think the phone phone factor is still like amazing then?

00:40:46,721 --> 00:40:55,347Speaker 1
40:46 - 40:55

or there's a lot of people who are skeptical about like why do we need another device if eventually Apple is going to blast a new version of Siri to everybody?

00:40:55,387 --> 00:40:57,469Speaker 0
40:55 - 40:57

Yeah, I'm sure that's going to happen.

00:40:57,849 --> 00:41:03,353Speaker 0
40:57 - 41:03

I'm sure we accidentally accelerated these guys to make themselves push a little.

00:41:07,989 --> 00:41:13,315Speaker 0
41:07 - 41:13

There's no way to avoid that, because they're going to do what they're going to do.

00:41:13,736 --> 00:41:26,607Speaker 0
41:13 - 41:26

And my honest opinion towards that is that I've known enough people within these big companies to learn that, I think the general public don't get it.

00:41:27,168 --> 00:41:35,357Speaker 0
41:27 - 41:35

Sometimes, you know, we saw news that, oh, Apple is doing this, Apple is doing that, and Google is doing this, and Google is doing that.

00:41:35,978 --> 00:41:43,586Speaker 0
41:35 - 41:43

But if you really knew a couple of folks there, and they'll tell you, oh, they're just a small team of 10 people with a limited budget of $2 million.

00:41:44,167 --> 00:41:58,247Speaker 0
41:44 - 41:58

you know that's that's what's really is so for big companies that they have this massive established ecosystem that changing anything is going to be a very, very, very hard sequence.

00:41:58,747 --> 00:42:03,912Speaker 0
41:58 - 42:03

So I think, yes, you can wait, but it's going to be a long time.

00:42:04,092 --> 00:42:05,393Speaker 0
42:04 - 42:05

It's going to be a very long time.

00:42:05,573 --> 00:42:18,504Speaker 0
42:05 - 42:18

I don't personally foresee how Apple can, just based on the current experience of iOS, following the current incentives of the apps to basically encouraging people to build one app for one thing.

00:42:20,405 --> 00:42:23,886Speaker 0
42:20 - 42:23

and all of a sudden reramps everything and makes something like a larger action model.

00:42:25,067 --> 00:42:27,388Speaker 0
42:25 - 42:27

And same to other companies.

00:42:27,468 --> 00:42:30,429Speaker 0
42:27 - 42:30

But however, I think, you know, phone factors, yes.

00:42:31,410 --> 00:42:32,990Speaker 0
42:31 - 42:32

I don't like to carry two devices.

00:42:33,751 --> 00:42:34,411Speaker 0
42:33 - 42:34

I personally don't.

00:42:34,991 --> 00:42:35,752Speaker 0
42:34 - 42:35

I think no one should.

00:42:36,312 --> 00:42:37,833Speaker 0
42:36 - 42:37

If you can carry one device, you should.

00:42:39,774 --> 00:42:49,004Speaker 0
42:39 - 42:49

But I think a lot of people are Not holding an R1 in our hand, and if you hold your R1 in your hand, you're surprised how light it is.

00:42:49,244 --> 00:42:50,405Speaker 0
42:49 - 42:50

It's 110 grams.

00:42:51,346 --> 00:42:54,628Speaker 0
42:51 - 42:54

And try to go to your fridge and pick two eggs, and that's it.

00:42:55,288 --> 00:42:59,091Speaker 0
42:55 - 42:59

And then how small it is, because I have a ridiculously small hand.

00:42:59,311 --> 00:43:01,812Speaker 0
42:59 - 43:01

So I think my demos is not a good reference.

00:43:02,213 --> 00:43:03,253Speaker 0
43:02 - 43:03

I just met another guy.

00:43:03,273 --> 00:43:05,375Speaker 0
43:03 - 43:05

They're like, oh, you did this wrong, because you have a small hand.

00:43:05,735 --> 00:43:08,497Speaker 0
43:05 - 43:08

People don't get how small it is.

00:43:08,657 --> 00:43:13,620Speaker 0
43:08 - 43:13

It's the exact same footprint of your iPhone Pro Max.

00:43:18,667 --> 00:43:26,948Speaker 1
43:18 - 43:26

People said that even for the Vision Pro ad where they said Apple pick people not with big heads.

00:43:27,029 --> 00:43:27,289Speaker 1
43:27 - 43:27

Yeah.

00:43:27,709 --> 00:43:31,572Speaker 1
43:27 - 43:31

Ideally you want to pick people with big heads because the Vision Pro headset looks so massive.

00:43:31,612 --> 00:43:31,912Speaker 1
43:31 - 43:31

Right.

00:43:33,093 --> 00:43:34,393Speaker 1
43:33 - 43:34

I don't think it really matters.

00:43:34,494 --> 00:43:35,294Speaker 0
43:34 - 43:35

Exactly, yeah.

00:43:35,314 --> 00:43:41,999Speaker 0
43:35 - 43:41

But I think, you know, like I said, no one can confidently say, oh hey, this is the best phone factor.

00:43:42,519 --> 00:43:49,784Speaker 0
43:42 - 43:49

I personally think that phone is good because it's just a little piece of glass with a basically edge-to-edge screen.

00:43:49,804 --> 00:43:51,285Speaker 0
43:49 - 43:51

that's the current generation of phone is.

00:43:52,966 --> 00:44:09,595Speaker 0
43:52 - 44:09

But phones are relatively easy to Not from engineering wise, but purely from resource wise, there's a lot of reference designs, you know, teenage engineering, which I said helped bootstrap nothing, the entire nothing with co-pay.

00:44:10,436 --> 00:44:12,117Speaker 0
44:10 - 44:12

So we know the phone business quite well.

00:44:12,597 --> 00:44:18,120Speaker 0
44:12 - 44:18

Phones are relatively easy to source if you're talking about parts and everything, and everything is more established.

00:44:18,852 --> 00:44:22,273Speaker 0
44:18 - 44:22

But I don't think that we should just present a phone for the first generation.

00:44:22,313 --> 00:44:28,776Speaker 0
44:22 - 44:28

We'd rather do something small, cheap, and fun, and slowly evolve through that.

00:44:28,796 --> 00:44:33,938Speaker 0
44:28 - 44:33

So there's no guarantee that we said, oh, we're not going to make the phone.

00:44:34,978 --> 00:44:39,560Speaker 0
44:34 - 44:39

We can, but I don't think make the phone as first generation is a good choice.

00:44:40,300 --> 00:44:44,442Speaker 0
44:40 - 44:44

But for those companies out there, I think they started to try something new.

00:44:44,482 --> 00:44:48,063Speaker 0
44:44 - 44:48

You know, like we see Meta start trying glasses and all that different stuff.

00:44:52,810 --> 00:44:56,839Speaker 0
44:52 - 44:56

It's a vehicle that hosts what's inside and the software experience matters.

00:45:03,502 --> 00:45:10,569Speaker 0
45:03 - 45:10

a piece of hardware, that's the vehicle to host LAM and RabbitOS and good services like Proxity.

00:45:10,589 --> 00:45:12,450Speaker 0
45:10 - 45:12

I think the software experience matters.

00:45:12,871 --> 00:45:14,933Speaker 0
45:12 - 45:14

So to us, it's almost like Apple.

00:45:14,993 --> 00:45:26,103Speaker 0
45:14 - 45:26

We figured out LAM, and LAM is so good that we have that, and we quickly realized that this cannot be easily developed as an app, easily developed as anything out there, and running on their platform.

00:45:26,523 --> 00:45:29,605Speaker 0
45:26 - 45:29

So we decided to do this hardware.

00:45:30,086 --> 00:45:35,130Speaker 0
45:30 - 45:35

And if you think about Apple, iPad was actually before iPhone.

00:45:35,730 --> 00:45:39,693Speaker 0
45:35 - 45:39

iPad was the first project in this current generation.

00:45:39,713 --> 00:45:41,094Speaker 0
45:39 - 45:41

Now, iPhone was actually later on.

00:45:41,474 --> 00:45:46,318Speaker 0
45:41 - 45:46

But Steve first wants to build a glass, just a pad.

00:45:46,778 --> 00:45:47,679Speaker 0
45:46 - 45:47

So here's the iPad.

00:45:48,299 --> 00:45:53,023Speaker 0
45:48 - 45:53

And Steve asked the team to research on how to work on it, how to interact with it.

00:45:53,423 --> 00:45:55,265Speaker 0
45:53 - 45:55

And the Apple engineer presented MultiTouch.

00:45:56,065 --> 00:46:02,988Speaker 0
45:56 - 46:02

And the multi-touch experience is so good that Steve actually postponed the iPad project just to do the iPhone straight away.

00:46:04,168 --> 00:46:07,490Speaker 0
46:04 - 46:07

I think LAM gives us a similar feeling.

00:46:07,550 --> 00:46:16,954Speaker 0
46:07 - 46:16

We know LAM is so good that we don't want to just build an app, we don't want to just build a website, we don't want to build on a system that is not controlled.

00:46:18,626 --> 00:46:21,008Speaker 0
46:18 - 46:21

It's not specifically designed by BetaLamb.

00:46:21,068 --> 00:46:23,831Speaker 0
46:21 - 46:23

We'd rather take a little bit of risk to do hardware.

00:46:24,391 --> 00:46:27,114Speaker 0
46:24 - 46:27

But phone factor-wise, like I said, we de-risked that.

00:46:27,234 --> 00:46:28,174Speaker 0
46:27 - 46:28

We de-risked everything.

00:46:28,835 --> 00:46:30,857Speaker 0
46:28 - 46:30

And R1 is the result of de-risking.

00:46:31,978 --> 00:46:33,519Speaker 0
46:31 - 46:33

But no one knows the correct phone factor.

00:46:33,559 --> 00:46:34,159Speaker 1
46:33 - 46:34

I have to say that.

00:46:35,220 --> 00:46:35,901Speaker 0
46:35 - 46:35

The market will tell.

00:46:37,930 --> 00:47:01,096Speaker 1
46:37 - 47:01

Speaking of that, the market that you've seen so far, the 50,000 people that have ordered your device and hopefully hundreds of thousands more, what are you seeing as use cases people are excited about and how much of that requires something like real-time live information, the kind of information that Perplexity provides you?

00:47:01,176 --> 00:47:08,939Speaker 0
47:01 - 47:08

Yeah, so for me, I've been carrying R1, the earliest version in the prototype, and now I have the ready version.

00:47:09,380 --> 00:47:13,961Speaker 0
47:09 - 47:13

I've been carrying R1 in my pocket for probably the past 6 to 8 months.

00:47:16,158 --> 00:47:23,207Speaker 0
47:16 - 47:23

Couple of the scenarios I really, really don't need my phone is that, first of all, search.

00:47:23,447 --> 00:47:33,560Speaker 0
47:23 - 47:33

I don't think the current app on your phone or website are giving you even close, reasonable answers and accurate answers and precise answers.

00:47:35,785 --> 00:47:39,587Speaker 0
47:35 - 47:39

biggest reason that perplexity becomes perplexity, because the search wasn't just good.

00:47:39,867 --> 00:47:44,329Speaker 0
47:39 - 47:44

But there's a lot of daily search I need, and I would rather to just get a pinpoint answer.

00:47:44,970 --> 00:47:47,411Speaker 0
47:44 - 47:47

So I use search, obviously, I use search a lot.

00:47:47,811 --> 00:48:11,638Speaker 0
47:47 - 48:11

And it's actually easy for me to do that on R1, because I probably on something else, you know, all the time, I probably have, you know, my Slack's message coming, I probably on X and checking on Twitters, I probably on a on the email thread, then for that blink of a second, I just press that button and ask the question.

00:48:11,658 --> 00:48:12,819Speaker 0
48:11 - 48:12

that gives me the answer right away.

00:48:13,320 --> 00:48:14,401Speaker 0
48:13 - 48:14

So I use search a lot.

00:48:15,161 --> 00:48:16,302Speaker 0
48:15 - 48:16

I also like the music.

00:48:17,966 --> 00:48:24,427Speaker 0
48:17 - 48:24

Because again, music today is more of a companionship other than dedicated activities.

00:48:24,468 --> 00:48:29,169Speaker 0
48:24 - 48:29

You don't just call your friend and be like, hey, everyone, what are you up to this afternoon?

00:48:29,189 --> 00:48:31,609Speaker 0
48:29 - 48:31

And you'll be like, hey, Jesse, I listened to three hours of music.

00:48:31,829 --> 00:48:32,729Speaker 0
48:31 - 48:32

No one does this.

00:48:32,769 --> 00:48:35,550Speaker 0
48:32 - 48:35

Music is on the go, it's on the backend, it's on ambient.

00:48:36,990 --> 00:48:38,110Speaker 0
48:36 - 48:38

But we do need music.

00:48:38,150 --> 00:48:44,054Speaker 0
48:38 - 48:44

So music is always kind of like, sit behind the scene role, kind of like that.

00:48:44,414 --> 00:48:46,556Speaker 0
48:44 - 48:46

So I give you a live example.

00:48:48,277 --> 00:48:59,666Speaker 0
48:48 - 48:59

Sometimes I play games and I'm literally focused on the game, but I can then press that button and change the song and play the entire different collection of my music library.

00:48:59,926 --> 00:49:00,807Speaker 0
48:59 - 49:00

That feels really cool.

00:49:01,908 --> 00:49:05,311Speaker 0
49:01 - 49:05

And given by the fact that the music starts immediately, 500 minutes.

00:49:06,191 --> 00:49:23,604Speaker 0
49:06 - 49:23

Another big scenario is I'm living in Los Angeles, on road, driving the cars, and no matter what kind of different car systems you are with, R1 connects to my Bluetooth.

00:49:30,629 --> 00:49:35,652Speaker 0
49:30 - 49:35

I search for a gas station or charging spot and as well as control my home media.

00:49:36,093 --> 00:49:40,355Speaker 0
49:36 - 49:40

I think that really, really is a really, really satisfied experience.

00:49:40,575 --> 00:49:50,602Speaker 1
49:40 - 49:50

And one thing that's really satisfying to me is that at least finally now people can experience other kinds of search products, search experiences.

00:49:51,800 --> 00:49:59,784Speaker 1
49:51 - 49:59

rather than having to be dictated upon one decision on swipe down your screen because someone's paying you a lot of money.

00:50:00,505 --> 00:50:01,785Speaker 1
50:00 - 50:01

So I think that's great.

00:50:01,825 --> 00:50:07,368Speaker 1
50:01 - 50:07

And we should push the field forward with more cutting edge experiences for others.

00:50:07,428 --> 00:50:11,871Speaker 1
50:07 - 50:11

And hopefully, that's also another motivating factor for people to explore this new device.

00:50:11,911 --> 00:50:12,991Speaker 0
50:11 - 50:12

Yeah, definitely.

00:50:13,591 --> 00:50:20,315Speaker 0
50:13 - 50:20

And finally, I want to mention a new thing that I'm currently super interested in is the capability of the camera plus search.

00:50:21,107 --> 00:50:25,609Speaker 0
50:21 - 50:25

So Vision Class Search, that's Pokedex, basically.

00:50:25,629 --> 00:50:33,452Speaker 0
50:25 - 50:33

You point to the Pikachu and ask what this is, and it gives you an entire Wikipedia density of answers.

00:50:33,472 --> 00:50:38,453Speaker 0
50:33 - 50:38

I think that's such a great educational tool for the younger generation.

00:50:38,494 --> 00:50:42,075Speaker 0
50:38 - 50:42

I mean, I grew up, I wanted to learn everything about everything.

00:50:42,675 --> 00:50:57,045Speaker 0
50:42 - 50:57

And now think about if we can put a real Pokedex in the future generation of kids, and then you take them to the zoo, take them to the park, and they just start exploring using this vision plus advanced search type capacity.

00:50:57,065 --> 00:51:01,449Speaker 0
50:57 - 51:01

I think that's a very, very exciting scenario.

00:51:03,311 --> 00:51:16,689Speaker 1
51:03 - 51:16

Yeah, I guess that's a... good point to wrap this up and I'm super excited to work with Rabbit and hopefully this is the beginning of something amazing for many years to come.

00:51:16,849 --> 00:51:17,749Speaker 0
51:16 - 51:17

Yeah, sounds good.

00:51:17,789 --> 00:51:19,090Speaker 0
51:17 - 51:19

I mean, it's just getting started.

00:51:20,030 --> 00:51:30,155Speaker 0
51:20 - 51:30

We know that most of our team are working together on some really, really exciting things to make it much, much more than what we should do today.

00:51:30,635 --> 00:51:38,860Speaker 0
51:30 - 51:38

But I think the key for us is we want to work with the best services on our device.

00:51:39,621 --> 00:51:45,946Speaker 0
51:39 - 51:45

And search is such an important catalog that we simply want to choose the best.

00:51:46,146 --> 00:51:50,751Speaker 0
51:46 - 51:50

And Perplexity is the best right now in the market, given by my own test.

00:51:52,112 --> 00:51:56,075Speaker 0
51:52 - 51:56

But we know everyone probably, in your mind, you have probably 10 more ideas.

00:51:56,316 --> 00:51:59,378Speaker 0
51:56 - 51:59

I probably have 10 more ideas on how we can make it even better.

00:52:00,299 --> 00:52:01,020Speaker 0
52:00 - 52:01

That's where we're heading.

00:52:01,300 --> 00:52:02,061Speaker 1
52:01 - 52:02

Yeah, absolutely.

00:52:04,195 --> 00:52:08,536Speaker 1
52:04 - 52:08

Cool, thank you everybody for joining, and hopefully you can go and purchase your R1.

00:52:08,797 --> 00:52:09,737Speaker 0
52:08 - 52:09

Yeah, sounds good.

00:52:09,877 --> 00:52:12,838Speaker 0
52:09 - 52:12

So we will send the email with the Procreate Suite code.

00:52:13,678 --> 00:52:20,840Speaker 0
52:13 - 52:20

And if you just follow the announcement on our Twitter, we'll make sure this is a very smooth experience.

00:52:21,521 --> 00:52:26,402Speaker 0
52:21 - 52:26

And yeah, thanks for the generous offer again, Ervin and the Procreate Suite team.

00:52:26,542 --> 00:52:27,483Speaker 0
52:26 - 52:27

We're super excited.

00:52:29,843 --> 00:52:30,103Speaker 0
52:29 - 52:30

Thank you.

00:52:30,144 --> 00:52:30,424Speaker 0
52:30 - 52:30

Thank you.

00:52:30,684 --> 00:52:30,904Speaker 1
52:30 - 52:30

See you.

00:52:30,984 --> 00:52:31,624Speaker 0
52:30 - 52:31

All right, bye-bye.

00:52:40,663 --> 00:52:43,240Speaker 0
52:40 - 52:43

This space was downloaded via spacesdown.com.

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52:43 - 52:45

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